“Even more fundamental than the action and necessary to the action, is the watching itself.” (Jane Jacobs)   I believe that a photograph is interesting when instead of increasing our knowledge of the world, succeeds to alter our respective perceptions of it. The smaller the difference, the more intense is the effect. From this viewpoint and within the limitations of the medium, the photographer is an author who creates a fiction in close proximity to reality.The world photographed should appear both familiar and strange at the same time.In this series of photos I want to explore not the unspecified event but the human expression as a response to that event by turning my camera away and towards the crowd.  In this sense the series has an almost conceptual framework intensified by the repetition of form however it remains firmly rooted in the street-documentary spirit. Despite the nature of the project that calls for consistency rather than great stand alone pictures, I wanted most photographs to embrace a shared moment between the photographer and the subject, a kind of intimacy that might last all of a split of a second yet is timeless all the same. Capturing my subject’s unguarded moments from a very close distance, these are direct but non-confrontational shots with an attempt to keep the tone as calm and warm as possible. At the same time I was seeking to feel and convey that special tension that occurs when, confronting a line-up of people looking towards an implied spectacle, the visual connection is momentarily suspended, and the photographer (and consequently the viewer of the photograph) comes to take its place.
       
     
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  “Even more fundamental than the action and necessary to the action, is the watching itself.” (Jane Jacobs)   I believe that a photograph is interesting when instead of increasing our knowledge of the world, succeeds to alter our respective perceptions of it. The smaller the difference, the more intense is the effect. From this viewpoint and within the limitations of the medium, the photographer is an author who creates a fiction in close proximity to reality.The world photographed should appear both familiar and strange at the same time.In this series of photos I want to explore not the unspecified event but the human expression as a response to that event by turning my camera away and towards the crowd.  In this sense the series has an almost conceptual framework intensified by the repetition of form however it remains firmly rooted in the street-documentary spirit. Despite the nature of the project that calls for consistency rather than great stand alone pictures, I wanted most photographs to embrace a shared moment between the photographer and the subject, a kind of intimacy that might last all of a split of a second yet is timeless all the same. Capturing my subject’s unguarded moments from a very close distance, these are direct but non-confrontational shots with an attempt to keep the tone as calm and warm as possible. At the same time I was seeking to feel and convey that special tension that occurs when, confronting a line-up of people looking towards an implied spectacle, the visual connection is momentarily suspended, and the photographer (and consequently the viewer of the photograph) comes to take its place.
       
     

“Even more fundamental than the action and necessary to the action, is the watching itself.” (Jane Jacobs)

I believe that a photograph is interesting when instead of increasing our knowledge of the world, succeeds to alter our respective perceptions of it. The smaller the difference, the more intense is the effect. From this viewpoint and within the limitations of the medium, the photographer is an author who creates a fiction in close proximity to reality.The world photographed should appear both familiar and strange at the same time.In this series of photos I want to explore not the unspecified event but the human expression as a response to that event by turning my camera away and towards the crowd.

In this sense the series has an almost conceptual framework intensified by the repetition of form however it remains firmly rooted in the street-documentary spirit. Despite the nature of the project that calls for consistency rather than great stand alone pictures, I wanted most photographs to embrace a shared moment between the photographer and the subject, a kind of intimacy that might last all of a split of a second yet is timeless all the same. Capturing my subject’s unguarded moments from a very close distance, these are direct but non-confrontational shots with an attempt to keep the tone as calm and warm as possible. At the same time I was seeking to feel and convey that special tension that occurs when, confronting a line-up of people looking towards an implied spectacle, the visual connection is momentarily suspended, and the photographer (and consequently the viewer of the photograph) comes to take its place.

02_stillGoing.jpg
       
     
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09_stillGoing.jpg
       
     
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12_stillGoing.jpg